Changes to ASTM Standards for Environmental Due Diligence in 2021

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There is a big change on the horizon that will significantly impact commercial real estate transactions, especially for industrial manufacturing properties with suspected contamination in the building or soil. ASTM E1527-13, entitled Standard Practice for Environmental Site Assessments: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment Process, is the nationally recognized standard for evaluating environmental risk at a commercial property during acquisition or financing.

First released in 1993, the standard has been revised in 1994, 1997, 2000, 2005, and most recently in 2013. The ASTM standards expire every eight years, and ASTM E1527-13 is scheduled to sunset on December 31, 2021.  Therefore, the new standard, ASTM E1527-21, must be finalized and published sometime in 2021.

The ASTM subcommittee in charge of this process is considering updating certain key components to the standard. These changes are sure to have an impact on future commercial real estate transactions. While numerous changes are being proposed, most are relatively minor, aimed at reinforcing the current standard.  A few, however, will have a significant impact on the standard.

If you have been involved in the procurement, preparation, review, or use of a Phase I ESA Report, you know the biggest concern many environmental professionals, buyers/sellers of commercial property, and lending institutions struggle with is “Are there one or more Recognized Environmental Conditions [RECs] at the subject property?”. Just what defines a REC has progressed through revisions to ASTM E1527 in an effort to clarify this most critical concern. The forthcoming ASTM E1527-21 standard will likely update the definition of a REC.

To heighten awareness, E1527-21 proposes to include Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances [PFAS]  and other emerging contaminants in Non-Scope Considerations that some environmental professionals and end-users may want to evaluate as part of a Phase I ESA report.

How long is a report good for? EPAs All Appropriate Inquiries [AAI] Rule mandates specific components to be conducted within 180 days of the date of the property purchase or intended transaction. These components are 1) interviews with owners, operators, and occupants; 2) environmental cleanup lien research; 3) visual inspection of the property and adjoining properties; 4) review of government records; and 5) declaration by an environmental professional. After one year, the entire Phase I ESA report must be updated to meet the AAI Rule.

The above text was excerpted from Omni Environmental Group.

If you own and wish to sell a suspected environmental impacted property in Southern California then please contact us so we can present it to a buyer that specifically seeks this type of commercial real estate acquisition opportunity.

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